Error error bee

I was doing some research into external law courses and called up the agents representing one of the external LLB programmes.

A heavily PRC accented voice answered and the person behind the voice tried very hard to comprehend my enquiry, which was, “where can I get more information about admission criteria for the LLB course?”

“Which course?”, said the heavily accented voice.

“LLB”, said I.

“Er, sorry, which course?” asked the voice again.

“LLB”, again I said.

“Error, error B? Uh, I dunno that course”, said the voice.

“Law”, I said.

“Orh. Law. OK”.

“Yes”

“Uh, the persng in charge eeser notte eeng, maybe you give me your telephong number I gette the persng to call you back”.

“Uh… OK”.

Don’t laugh. 1.3 billion people can’t be all wrong, and they have different methods of teaching English.

(via Jiahao Chen (thanks dude))

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7 thoughts on “Error error bee”

  1. Well, at least that persng was helpful at the end. I actually enjoy listening to Chinese nationals speak English – they over enunciate (many Singaporeans don't bother to enunciate) in their valiant efforts to speak the language. They also speak with intonations while many of us here speak in a monotone. And I don't laugh at their efforts.

  2. The over-enunciating, I think it's called putting in a 'schwa' where there aren't actually any vowels. So, some of them attend Pallinserton University, which is an Ivy League college, you know? Like Harvard?

  3. Damn, you had me thinking there! Princeton, you were trying to over-enunciate? Yes, sometimes spending time in the States do not help. I did some transcription work for a Professor here, who was originally from China. Man! I had a hard time, deciding whether he was saying 'er…' after the word 'that' or if he was over-enunciating the 't' in 'that'. In the end I told him I dropped all hesitations like 'er…', 'um…' and so on (this is only one e.g.). However, having said that, I somehow preferred the way he spoke to those of the S'porean students he was interviewing! Another Chinese I met a long time ago when Chinese professionals were a rarity in S'pore told me he learnt to speak by listening to VOA (Voice of America) on the radio, and I must say he speaks way better than the Professor who possibly went to Pallinserton!

  4. The over-enunciating, I think it's called putting in a 'schwa' where there aren't actually any vowels. So, some of them attend Pallinserton University, which is an Ivy League college, you know? Like Harvard?

  5. Damn, you had me thinking there! Princeton, you were trying to over-enunciate? Yes, sometimes spending time in the States do not help. I did some transcription work for a Professor here, who was originally from China. Man! I had a hard time, deciding whether he was saying 'er…' after the word 'that' or if he was over-enunciating the 't' in 'that'. In the end I told him I dropped all hesitations like 'er…', 'um…' and so on (this is only one e.g.). However, having said that, I somehow preferred the way he spoke to those of the S'porean students he was interviewing! Another Chinese I met a long time ago when Chinese professionals were a rarity in S'pore told me he learnt to speak by listening to VOA (Voice of America) on the radio, and I must say he speaks way better than the Professor who possibly went to Pallinserton!

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