We are Singapore: Doing the Sub-Continental

It’s always good to be able to wake up late at 1.30pm on Sunday. Especially if you’ve only gone to sleep at 8am on Sunday.

But you have to wake up early enough on Sunday afternoon, because you’d waste your whole weekend if you slept in. So, cannot sleep in. So that can go out. So that can you can spend a whole hour deciding what to do while on the way out because you didn’t decide what to do beforehand. Y’know?

On the way out, I passed by the guardhouse outside some Cabinet Minister’s house, and outside the guardhouse stood a Gurkha guard in his distinctive Gurkha hat and equally distinctive HK-MP5 sub-machinegun. (He had some clothes on of course, but they weren’t that distinctive). I waved, but he didn’t wave back, and I decided I’d go for some Nepalese food for lunch.

I had previously driven past a Nepalese restaurant called ‘The Yak & the Yeti‘ somewhere behind Race Course Road in Little India, so I thought that might be the place to go to, but alas, don’t have. No more Yak, and the Yeti disappear liao.

But there was a restaurant called ‘Gurkha Palace‘, and the menu placed outside listed Nepalese as well as Indian fare. I ate myself to death. So much that I don’t remember much of it except that I have savoured the bestest naan in the universe.

Then I rolled across Race Course Road to Farrer Park, because from across Race Course Road, there looked like there were games of rugby and cricket going on in the park. If you don’t already know, these are the two games played in heaven. Rugby in winter and Cricket in summer.

I had previously read about migrant workers from the sub-continent using this patch of grass on Sundays for makeshift cricket games, and it was good to see that it was everything I expected: the dusty wicket, the quick bowlers wiping sweat from their brows before trundling in, the barefoot batsman swinging and missing, and the fielding team raising half-hearted appeals. It doesn’t matter if you don’t understand a single thing about cricket because to see this game is to see real sport. (EPL, Manchester United and S-League’s not sport, it’s business.)

I don’t know how many batsmen got out before me and my companion decided to go do something else, like having coffee in an air-conditioned place, like a shopping mall.

Howzat? Cricket at Farrer ParkHowzat? Cricket at Farrer ParkHowzat? Cricket at Farrer Park
Howzat? Cricket at Farrer Park

We're Singapore, so must wear Ang Moh shirts
We're Singapore, so must wear Ang Moh shirts
Don’t mind us looking like Ang Moh ok? We’re Singapore, you know?

Surf stop: Nibble & Scribble

iTunes Party Shuffle is playing a copy of Locked Out from the album “Recurring Dream: The Very Best of Crowded House” by Crowded House

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12 thoughts on “We are Singapore: Doing the Sub-Continental”

  1. mmm… Nepalese food. You should try the fried ladies fingers, think it’s called ‘Ram Toriya’. Believe me, you’ll never look at ladies fingers (the vegetable, at least) the same way again.
    Another good Nepalese restaurant is the Gurkha Grill, on Smith Street in Chinatown. It’s at one of the shophuses behind the open-air hawker area.

  2. mmm… Nepalese food. You should try the fried ladies fingers, think it’s called ‘Ram Toriya’. Believe me, you’ll never look at ladies fingers (the vegetable, at least) the same way again.
    Another good Nepalese restaurant is the Gurkha Grill, on Smith Street in Chinatown. It’s at one of the shophuses behind the open-air hawker area.

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