My National Day Parade

I remember National Day Parade 1990 the most because it’s the NDP I was involved in.

It was held at the Padang, and it featured the most impressive mobile column display since independence, involving all the military hardware and soldiers (like us) of the day.

At the beginning of that year, my battalion mates and I were in our second year of National Service – and for some reason, there was a what was called a “lull period” in our training program. By May, it became clear why that was so, as plans for the Padang parade were passed down through the combat and support companies. Our battalion was to supply one company sized mobile column/marching contingent and three companies of construction labour to build the spectator stands for the parade.

I’m not sure how it works these days, but in our time, the method of divvying up the work was this: the worst performing combat company got the marching duties. It might seem strange that the worst get rewarded by being in the limelight. But look further and you’ll realise that the mobile column/marching contingent has copped the rawest deal – hours and days of rehearsals, starching of uniforms, polishing of boots and armoured vehicles.

We moved in to the Padang in June, helping to unload the metal tubes that made up the grandstands, and then building the grandstands. It was like a giant Ikea assembly project as our sergeants and officers argued over the engineers’ manuals and instructed us to build the several storey tall structure by trial and error.

When night fell, guards were mounted from our ranks and we patrolled the Padang to ensure no one stole or sabotaged the grandstand. It was great fun.

Across the road from the Padang, where the Esplanade now stands was a hawker centre known as the Satay Club. We’d stray from our route and buy food and drink (with the blessing of the guard commander ensconced in a command tent on the grounds of the St Andrew’s Cathedral) and eat till our hearts’ content.

With the wee hours came some unusual encounters for the patrols. A group of transvestites used to frequent the Satay Club nightly, and it wasn’t because they liked to eat satay a lot. When day broke on one of the first few days we were at the Padang, our Regimental Sergeant Major had inspected the construction site and discovered condom wrappers, used condoms and other associated debris strewn around the grandstand area – people had been using the nooks and crannies made by our stacks of building material to explore their own nooks and crannies.

The order was put out unequivocally – we were not to allow any such monkey business to happen, and we were to apprehend (nicely) any civilian who were caught doing so, and ask them to leave the area and get a room. If they were to resist, we were to call our guard commander via our walky talkies, who would then call the cops via telephone at the cathedral.

So we patrolled a lot more diligently, shining torchlights into dark places and asking couples in various degrees of undress to leave the area for their safety. Thankfully, on my patrols, most did without resisting. But there was the incident of a patrol who encountered a group of belligerent transvestites who threatened them with bodily harm. By the time the police arrived, the guard commander was cowering under his table while the ladyboys sat on top and ransacked the things that were there.

I also celebrated my 21st birthday while serving a weekend guard duty at the Padang. That night, my buddies left the compound to buy a cake, some satay and lots of beer. We passed out drunk somewhere on the field and only got woken up when some transvestites wanted to trespass again.

More good times were had after the grandstand was built and when the other participants in the parade arrived for dress rehearsals. After being asked to test the grandstand by jumping up and down on them (and not causing a collapse and killing ourselves) we hung out near the Singapore Airlines contingent and asked the Singapore Girls how they had been selected to march – whether they had been rated the worst among their peers or something. They mostly ignored us.

On National Day itself, I was tasked to take my recce motorcycle and station myself at a car park somewhere in Raffles Place and guide VIP vehicles in and out of the area.

So, apart from seeing the aircraft of the RSAF perform their flypast, I missed the entire parade.

Troopers from 46SAR celebrating the completion of the spectator stands, July 1990 (I'm 3rd from left)
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10 thoughts on “My National Day Parade”

  1. haha i've done the entire mix – padang guards, construction of grandstand, parade contingent, packing of fun packs, cold calling ticket winners, and road marshalling on actual parade/preview/rehearsal days

  2. yo… comrade… fellow troopers from 46SAR. so your CO was LHY right?

    i different cohort, i enlisted in 96. we also kenna NDP in 97 but luckily only mass display. That y i use this nick.

    1. Lee Hsien Yang wasn’t my CO. I was in the batch right after. There’s a great story about how when he was a trainee Armour officer in SOA and there was a tank instructor called Sergeant Lee Kuan Yew, and how SGT Lee thought it was funny, one morning when he saw OCT Lee walk by his office, to remark in Hokkien, “Wah, Kua Tio Lau Peh Bian Kio Ah?” which in English meant something to the effect of, “What an unfilial son who doesn’t even bother to greet his father”, which in Singapore meant SGT Lee remained a Sergeant for the rest of his career.

      1. If I may add. I was also a fellow exponent of the overturning drill and yes there was such a Sergeant Lee Kuan Yew. He was in 40 SAR by the time when you were in 46 SAR. If I recalled correctly, he was the Alpha Coy Tank Platoon Platoon Sergeant and a bit of a nut case (Actually most of them were) and guard duty was always interesting when he was the BOS – “TURN OUT!, TURN OUT! TURN OUT!!!” all night long. Not sure if he a Sergeant all the way though. The version I heard was that he was at some point in time a Staff and then the crab fell off his sleeve cos of another one of his antics of which there were lots of stories.

    2. Lee Hsien Yang wasn’t my CO. I was in the batch right after. There’s a great story about how when he was a trainee Armour officer in SOA and there was a tank instructor called Sergeant Lee Kuan Yew, and how SGT Lee thought it was funny, one morning when he saw OCT Lee walk by his office, to remark in Hokkien, “Wah, Kua Tio Lau Peh Bian Kio Ah?” which in English meant something to the effect of, “What an unfilial son who doesn’t even bother to greet his father”, which in Singapore meant SGT Lee remained a Sergeant for the rest of his career.

    3. Lee Hsien Yang wasn’t my CO. I was in the batch right after. There’s a great story about how when he was a trainee Armour officer in SOA and there was a tank instructor called Sergeant Lee Kuan Yew, and how SGT Lee thought it was funny, one morning when he saw OCT Lee walk by his office, to remark in Hokkien, “Wah, Kua Tio Lau Peh Bian Kio Ah?” which in English meant something to the effect of, “What an unfilial son who doesn’t even bother to greet his father”, which in Singapore meant SGT Lee remained a Sergeant for the rest of his career.

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